Caring State & National News

Charlotte’s Web bill signed into law

June 16, 2014

Pink stethoscope with heart

Ryan Wiggins just texted me that Governor Rick Scott has signed into law the “Charlotte’s Web” bill that legalizes a special strain of cannabis that may help children deal with severe seizures. Wiggins is the owner and chief strategist at Full Contact Strategies that lobbied for the legislation.

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  • Ames June 17, 2014 at 7:43 pm

    Did they cite their research, though?

    In a case study, Dr. Edward Maa, Chief of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Denver Health in Denver, Colo., details one mother’s experience of providing medical marijuana to her child with Dravet syndrome. The adjunct therapy, a strain of cannabis high in CBD AND tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) known as Charlotte’s Web, was given in conjunction with the patient’s antiepileptic drug regimen. The child’s seizure frequency was reduced from 50 convulsions per day to 2 to 3 nighttime convulsions per month.

    emphasis mine

    A counter-point article summarizes current scientific evidence of CBD use in epilepsy and other neurological or psychiatric disorders including anxiety, schizophrenia and addiction. Previous studies found that THC, the primary psychoactive substance and CBD the main non-psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, display anticonvulsive properties in animals. However, this research was conducted in acute animal models and data is limited for chronic recurrent seizures. Recent studies claim medical marijuana with high ratios of CBD to THC are more effective in seizure control, but the data was anecdotal and not well controlled.
    “While cannabis has been used to treat epilepsy for centuries, data from double-blind randomized, controlled trials of CBD or THC in epilepsy is lacking,” explains Dr. Orrin Devinsky, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York and Saint Barnabas Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in New Jersey. “Randomized controlled studies of CBD in targeted epilepsy groups, such as patients with Dravet or Lennox-Gastaut syndromes, are in the planning stages.”
    Dr. Maria Roberta Cilio, Director of Research in Pediatric Epilepsy of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in San Francisco, agrees, “There is a critical need for new therapies, especially for childhood-onset treatment-resistant epilepsies that impair quality of life and contribute to learning and behavioral disorders. Rigorous investigation of the safety and efficacy of medical marijuana or individual components such as CBD are necessary for patients with epilepsy before any conclusion is made. ”

    Well now….