Poll: City voters split on monument removal, County voters want it to stay

According to a recent poll conducted by The Political Matrix, city of Pensacola voters are divided on whether the Confederate monument in the city’s Lee Square should be removed.

The two districts where over half the respondents believe the statue should stay are District 3, 54.1%, and District 4, 52.6%.   Districts 3 and 4 only have 177 and 170 Black voters, respectively – less than 3% each.

The two districts most supportive of removing the monument are District 6 (48.5%) and District 2 (47.1%). District 6 has 2,270 Black voters, District 2  915.

The districts that had the most respondents that need more information are District 7 (22.9%) and District 5 (18.2%).

City of Pensacola 

Do you think Confederate monument in downtown Pensacola should be removed?

Responses %
Yes 103 42%
No 111 45%
Need more info 34 14%
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Wu Myers Terhaar Moore Jerralds Hill Cannada-Wynn
Yes 36.8% 47.1% 40.5% 34.2% 42.4% 48.5% 42.9%
No 47.4% 41.2% 54.1% 52.6% 39.4% 42.4% 34.3%
Need more info 15.8% 11.8% 5.4% 13.2% 18.2% 9.1% 22.9%

Escambia County – Outside City Limits

Voters outside the city limits clearly want the city to keep the Confederate monument.

Do you think Confederate monument in downtown Pensacola should be removed?

Response %
Yes 184 31%
No 368 61%
Need more info 48 8%

The districts that have no city voters overwhelmingly oppose removing the statue. Black voters make up 15.7% of Bergosh’s district and 12.2% of Barry’s district.

Bergosh Barry
Yes 30.9% 22.0%
No 64.0% 69.5%
Need more info 5.1% 8.5%

 


Escambia County – City/County Voters

Portions of District 2, 3 and 4 are inside the city limits.  District 3 – with 49.4% Black voters – is the only district where more than half agreed with removing the monument.

Do you think Confederate monument in downtown Pensacola should be removed?

2 3 4
Underhill May Bender
Yes 27.7% 50.7% 36.8%
No 61.9% 37.0% 51.5%
Need more info 10.3% 12.3% 11.7%

 


Escambia County – Combined

The older the voter the more likely they oppose removing the Confederate monument.

Age 18-21 22-34 35-44 45+64 65+
Yes 52.3% 48.7% 47.6% 31.4% 22.5%
No 34.1% 39.3% 41.5% 60.3% 65.6%
Need more info 13.6% 12.0% 11.0% 8.4% 9.0%

Two-thirds of White voters oppose removal; Black voters favor removal by a larger percentage; and other minorities are split.

Race White Black Other
Yes 24.4% 78.1% 45.7%
No 66.8% 8.6% 42.9%
Need more info 8.7% 13.3% 11.4%

Republican voters have few doubts about keeping the monument.

Party Dems GOP  NPA
Yes 70.6% 9.6% 37.5%
No 20.1% 81.0% 50.0%
Need more info 9.2% 9.4% 12.5%

 


METHODOLOGY:

The persons sampled were Escambia County registered voters. The voters called had cell phones and landlines and were called using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system during the hours of 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. between June 20-22, 2020. The Margin of Error for this study is +/ 3.5% with a confidence level of 95%.

 

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3 thoughts on “Poll: City voters split on monument removal, County voters want it to stay

  1. Of course the vote was split. But what was unanimous was, the people want them left alone. Unanimous in the sense that there was not a single district that had over 50% vote to remove.

  2. A poll whether people think the sky is falling because Jimmy Fallon dressed up like Chris Rock would be interesting. Hell even Trump took the joke for the entire season of 2016. Is the country really that offended. I think not. Eddie Murphy as Buck Wheat– should he be shamed and cancelled? The power grab needs to be cancelled. People are also questioning the privileges of the people in poverty and the welfare state and subsequently labeled racists and fired. The movement afoot is not for equality. The change petitions are for replacing the government and instating the Democratic party in place with the embedded socialist progressive agenda. Don’t give into the mob.

  3. Hey Rick-
    Interesting results! Curious what the breakdowns are for demographics of the survey sample?

    As in, what are the age and race makeup of the total responses, and do they match the demographics of the community?

    FWIW, the margin of error on the City numbers is about 6% when you’ve only got about 250 responses.

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